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    When you are a Twitch moderator, you need to know multiple commands to control the platform. Since your channel may have many people logged in, you need to know about Twitch mod powers and how to enforce them.

    Today we will learn about all the relevant Twitch commands available to all members. Other commands are only available to mods, and you should also be aware of them to have absolute control over your streams. These are the most important categories we will cover:

    Let’s see what these Twitch mod commands are and how you can use them to have comfortable streaming experience on Twitch.

    Related: Best Twitch Emote Designer in 2021 – Top 7 Great Emote Designers for Twitch

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      Basic Twitch Commands Available to Everyone

      Twitch has been a streaming media that has many options for you to choose from. Most of its commands are visual, in a form of buttons.

      However, there are many other commands you need to type in the prompt line by hand, either in Twitch mod view or in normal view. Today we will see the most important ones.

      /mods

      You can use that command on the prompt line to make all moderators appear on screen while streaming on your channel.

      It is a simple command that will give you the universe of moderators, and you will have a better analysis of what is going on in your Twitch channel.

      /vips

      Here, you have one of the best commands you can use to identify VIP accounts on your Twitch channel.

      Many streamers say it’s one of Twitch’s most useful mod commands since you may see directly how many important users are on your channel.

      /color {COLORNAME}

      With this command, you can alter the pigmentation of your username when entering Twitch. It belongs to the universe of the Twitch editor commands.

      The most usual colors you may use are green and blue and many basic tones variations. You can ask for color codes rather than names since the Twitch system can identify them a lot easier.

      /color {HEXVALUE}

      It is the only way to change your username appearance color without writing the actual name. You must know the hex value of the color you want to jump in.

      It is a useful command with great Twitch mod powers and can give you the chance to renovate and improve your appearance to third users. 

      Twitch also has a hex value list for the most common colors. In case you need a specialized opinion on colors, you better find relevant software to guide you through the major variations that already exist.

      /block {USERNAME} 

      It is one of the best and most essential Twitch editor commands you are going to find online. It works the same way the block button operates for social media.

      When you are streaming on Twitch, there is a high chance you come across some users that will just want to create chaos in your channel.

      As a moderator, you can type block alongside the relevant username and stop seeing their messages or interactions on the prompt line. Alternatively, you may also press the block button from the participants’ menu. Both are equally effective to keep obnoxious persons away from your streams.

      /unblock {USERNAME}

      Sometimes, you may have misjudged some followers. In case you want to offer them a second chance, you can type unblock (and their usernames) to the prompt line.

      The unblocking can last at least for the current session of the live streams. However, if you have pressed unblock for a specific user, it would be highly unlikely you place him on the blocking side once again.

      /me {TEXT}

      That is one of the Twitch mod powers people have when streaming on their own channel. They can alter the color fonts of their messages.

      The only limitation is your username’s color that has to be unanimous to the one you are asking your texting to have. It is a very popular mod command that works for Twitch’s individual followers as long as they enter a channel that the moderator gives them permission to do so.

      /disconnect 

      If you feel like your streams have become unstable or there is a massive DDoS, or other hackers attack your server, then type this command to get disconnected. 

      That type of command is good for all the live streams since it can delay or avoid any type of abnormal interactions you may have with malware that could severely impact your computer. 

      /w{USERNAME}{MESSAGE} 

      It is the well-known whisper to any other user being in the same or another streaming room. It is also one of Twitch’s most popular mod commands giving each user the chance to send a direct message to any other user.

      That can give you the time to interact with the other user without getting noticed by others, or even the moderator who could be watching all your movements. 

      It has been the secret weapon available to moderators and users in Twitch to have the freedom of internal communication without other people or software intervention.

      Twitch users are fond of such communication lines and are good for Twitch followers only.


      Twitch Mod Commands for Twitch Advanced Streamers

      As it may be apparent now, most of the previous commands are available while still streaming. They are commands for simple users and even amateur streamers that have just initiated and established their Twitch channel.

      But what happens when you are a professional streamer or even an ambitious moderator? Do the same thinks are valid for your case? Here we are going to analyze the commands that are better directed for broadcasters and moderators, offering them increased power to allow or forbid many actions occurring in their streams or the affiliated ones.

      /user {USERNAME}

      That would be a rather simple command for a moderator and the one that can reveal more things about the followers attending a particular stream.

      With this command, a moderator can find information about a certain user’s profile. The only thing he has to do would be to write down the user command adding the username in brackets to ensure that the search will be conducted for the particular name.

      On the other hand, the moderator could scroll down in the followers’ list and find the usernames that he is interested in. He may then simply click on the usernames to find out more information about the specific user, like the way profiles appear on social media like Facebook and Instagram.

      /timeout {USERNAME} [SECONDS] 

      If you want to send somebody out of a certain channel but you don’t know how to time someone out on Twitch, then this command is for you.

      There are times when followers write unpleasant or even rude comments and annoy other users. When you want to punish this behavior, you can time the followers responsible for this behavior for as much time as you wish.

      Simply type timeout and the username of the person you would like to block. Then you can type the time frame you would like to see that person blocked in seconds. 

      If you forget to type about the duration in second, the Twitch system suggests by default the 10 minutes for each member that fails to align with your rules and regulations in streams.

      Every person can have different rules in his channel and enforce the timeout command to make sure that law and order get respected in this Twitch community.

      /ban {USERNAME}

      It is by far the most severe command you will ever find on Twitch. Most channel streamers who receive that punishment usually become better followers next time.

      In other words, when you type the word ban on the prompt line accompanied by the relevant username, you succeed in banning him from watching your streams in the particular channel forever.

      It would be nice if you started with the timeout command first to give followers an idea of what will come next. However, people who don’t seem to adjust their behavior even after a temporary timeout and keep on being rude and obnoxious can receive a permanent ban for long as the user is streaming on Twitch.

      /unban{USERNAME} 

      There are times when users reach you through email and ask you to allow them to watch your streams again.

      Since the ban belongs to the common Twitch commands, the exact same happens with unbanning as well. You can type unban on the prompt line and add the username next to it.

      Then you will have already offered the particular username a second chance to enter your streams. Be careful to use your unban command only for persons that have really stopped being rude and causing any problems in your streams.

      On any different occasion, these people can severely harm your Twitch channel’s quality and cause a rapid decrease in your followers’ number.

      /slow {USERNAME} 

      That has been the most useful command Twitch has initiated and introduced to the channel operators and streamers.

      It is not rare in Twitch streams to have users who send lots of messages in the chat room. That will rapidly decrease the attention followers give to your streams and leave you without ads sooner than later.

      By typing slow and the username next to it, you can set a number of messages that each follower can send to the chat room before getting slowed down by the system.

      Typically the Twitch moderator system can limit that amount of messages to ten per minute. That happens to avoid spams and bots entering the Twitch channels and deteriorating real communications and engagement between followers and streamers.

      /slowoff 

      That command is the exact opposite of the previous one. If you feel like you have slowed communications in your channel throughout your stream, you can restore them to the current speed.

      By typing slowoff to the prompt line, you may remove the slow command effect and become ready to listen to your followers once more, waiving the restrictions you have previously imposed.

      /subscribers 

      It is a favorite command for streamers who love to honor their subscribers. Even though Twitch doesn’t favorite followers to enter specific channels, you can do so.

      If you feel like many people enter your channel and watch your stream without giving you the status of the desirable sub would be better to show them the right thing.

      Write the subscribers command on the prompt line, and you can automatically set the chat room conversation visible only to subscribers. All the other followers who watch your stream will certainly get the message and press the subscribe button to become part of the company!

      /subscriberoff 

      On the other hand, you may feel like you have done too much for your subscribers. Maybe it’s time to limit their privilege to write on your chatroom.

      You can type “subscriberoff” to your command prompt, and then you will allow followers and non-subscribers to participate in the chatroom discussions. 

      It has been a very popular command lately since many new streamers would like to attract new followers that need to take their time before pressing the subscriber button.

      /clear

      It is as simple as it sounds. When you write clear on your command prompt line, you can delete your chat’s whole history.

      The command is one of the most useful you can find as a channel owner since it can give you full control of what you can keep as content in your chat room.

      Lately, we have seen many channel owners have issues with their sponsors and ad creators from comments being written and posted on their channel chatrooms. 

      Using the clear command, streamers can be sure that they will have only approved content posted on their channel.

      /uniquechat 

      Many streamers have to deal with followers who post copied content on the chatrooms. That could be spammy for most other users who post unique content.

      That belongs to the Twitch editor commands giving you the absolute freedom of choosing only the users who have something original to write and contribute to your channel.

      Lately, Twitch administrators have mentioned that bots and robots enter Twitch channels as normal followers and keep on posting the same pattern. That is why the uniquechat command can erase all the similar content posted to several channels across Twitch.

      /uniquechatoff 

      You can use that command to disable the “uniquechat” one. Twitch streamers like to control their chatrooms and enable followers to write what they like if it seems legit.

      /emoteonly

      Younger people usually express their feelings through emoticons. That is a general rule that also applies to Twitch chatrooms.

      When you type “emoteonly” on the command prompt line, you are ready to enable only emoticons to appear in your chatroom. That would be nice for people to express their feelings without writing long text.

      Additionally, that can make you find all the robots coming to your channel and eradicate their appearance since bots cannot post emoticons!

      /emoteonlyoff

      It has been the only command that can restore the text writing to the followers of a specific Twitch channel chatroom.

      Every administrator can disable the mandatory emoticon writing and leave his followers to write what they like in the chatroom.


      Best Twitch Commands for Streamers Only

      Other more complex commands apply to Twitch channel streamers and administrators. These commands help broadcasters come closer to their audience.

      On the other hand, you need to know these commands ever since you become a professional Twitch affiliate and start earning income from your streams.

      /commercial 

      Here, you have one of the best Twitch commands for monetized channels. It has helped thousands of Twitch affiliates to increase their income in a short period.

      When you write “commercial” on the prompt line, you ask the Twitch system to present ads to your followers for a default time of 30 seconds. 

      If you do that multiple times during your daily streams, you will have the chance to earn a vast amount of money and support yourself.

      There is a chance you can choose the commercials you will present to your audience. However, most amateur streamers on Twitch will not have the opportunity to select their ads for the first time they get involved with the platform.

      Later on, you can still communicate with Twitch administrators and present them ads that your audience likes to view according to your channel metrics. Then you will have all the time to check for the right commercials that you could promote during your streaming sessions on Twitch.

      /commercial {60|90|120} 

      Twitch offers its channel administrators and streamers to choose the specific time increments they wish to show ads to their audience.

      Most of the Twitch users choose the default settings that show ads to their followers only for 30 seconds at a time. Every time they write “commercial” to the command prompt line, the same effect happens. You can also enable followers only mode Twitch offers.

      However, when you grow on Twitch and your channel has more and more followers, you have the chance to adjust the commercials time presented to your audience.

      Simply write the seconds number next to the commercial command (30,60,90,120), and your ads will get shown for that specific time frame.

      Don’t exaggerate with your audience and gradually increase the ad’s time. Even though the earnings can be massive, you wouldn’t like your audience to lose interest in your streams due to the excessive ad exposure. 

      /host {channels} 

      Lately, Twitch has given the opportunity to established channels to host other channels in their streaming sessions.

      That has been able through a simple but powerful command, which is called a host. You simply write “host” on the prompt line, and you can choose a certain affiliate channel to enter your stream.

      The only prerequisite would be to know the hosted channel’s exact name and write it next to the previous command.

      Twitch operators and streamers would like to host other successful or uprising channels in their streams.

      The combination of two separate channels in one stream can create economies of scale and impress audiences.

      It could also make it easier for Twitch streamers to get affiliated and start earning a good income from their streams.

      /unhost 

      Sometimes, mixing different channels ends up not being such a good idea. 

      That may happen because some of the other channel’s followers could give you rude comments or even invite bots to ruin your chatroom.

      As a streamer, you can place an end to all of this mess simply by typing “unhost” to the command line. It would be easier to state the channel name next to the command so that the system knows about your intention to ban a certain channel from shared hosting.

      /raid{channels} 

      If it seems like you are going to end your stream, it would be great to offer your lead-in to one of your affiliated channels.

      To do so Twitch has developed and enabled a new command that is called “raid”. 

      Using this command (and the channel name next to it), you may easily divert all your channel followers towards the other channel that starts its daily streaming sessions.

      That could be annoying for some of your streamers. However, the chances are that most of your followers would find it tempting to jump to an affiliate channel and continue viewing even after you are gone.

      /unraid 

      If it seems like you have made a mistake with your previous raid command, then you can always take it back.

      Just type “raid” to the command prompt line, and your followers will come back to your channel. 

      The same is valid even after you have finished with your daily stream.

      /marker{description} 

      Many people abandon your stream right after entering your channel.

      That may happen because people don’t have a clue about your stream and what it could include.

      Using the marker command through the prompt line, you can add a certain description that could appear on your screen when new followers enter.

      It is one of the most useful commands to type if you realize that you have an issue with followers leaving your stream.

      Frequently Asked Questions

      In this section, we will check which are the most frequently asked questions about Twitch commands.

      The questions and data are all gathered from search engines like Google.

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