Code Streaming – Benefits and 5 Best Coding Channels to Follow

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If you’ve never heard about this before, it might sound a bit strange to find out that there are live streams and educational videos that people stream while they code.

This is a very popular way for future developers to learn programming, as they see a working code unfold.

Let’s see something more about that as well as what Twitch channel you should follow in order to enhance your machine learning.

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    What Is Code Streaming

    Code streaming refers to a specific category of streams where people stream as the code.

    You can find coding streams from all different branches of coding, whether you want to learn the basics of web design and web development, or you want to excel at more complicated program language.

    There are many benefits to learning to code this way, and I’ll get into that in just a bit.

    You can find this type of stream on most of the popular streaming platforms, but as you would expect, Twitch is the best place to go, as most people choose to stream there.

    To get you started, I have a list of the top 5 coding streamers, who you will not learn something from, but will enjoy watching, too.

    5 Code Streaming Channels to Follow

    If you are into the idea to learn about all of the software developer secrets by watching people that are streaming it, there are a few people that I would recommend.

    But, you should always be on the lookout, as there is an increasing number of developers who like to teach programming this way.

    Code Streaming

    1. CodingTrainChooChoo

    CodingTrainChooChoo actually posts a wide variety of content and topics that are related to programming.

    You can find something about algorithmic art, as well as things like machine learning and generative poetry.

    When it comes to the tutorials posted here, they are mostly about AI/ML or JavaScript.

    2. Traversy Media

    This Youtube channel has a huge library of videos, as well as video series, that will teach you the basics about web development, but go as far as MongoDB deployment.

    One thing that I particularly like about this channel is that the videos are completely unedited and there are no cuts between the steps.

    3. Jason Lengstorf

    Jason Lengstorf is a person who has very entertaining live streams.

    They are titled Learn with Jason, and on each stream, he will bring out a developer who will teach something, and Jason, together with you, will be learning this new thing.

    The streams last 90 minutes, and usually go over JavaScript and React techniques, with SaaS tools and platforms appearing from time to time, too.

    It really can’t get more interactive than this!

    4. Adam Wathan

    Adam is actually the creator of Tailwind CSS, and his streams and videos are an occasional activity.

    In them, he goes through his projects from start to finish, and he shows everything that goes along while he codes.

    By watching him, his viewers know exactly how their learning process will go, so that’s a great thing.

    5. csharpfritz

    This channel is a great option for people who want to do things with ASP.NET Core, .NET Core, Visual Studio, and just Windows tools in general.

    He streams on Twitch, but he also has a YouTube channel where he has a whole archive of very educational content.

    Benefits Of Watching Coding Streams

    While this method of learning to code might seem a bit unorthodox to you, there are actually several benefits to going about it this way.

    Some of these are probably going to be obvious to you, but overall, it’s very likely that you will notice that these factors are what make code streaming useful and a good way to learn to code.

    Interactive Learning

    While you absolutely can only watch these streams and not do anything while the streams last, it’s going to be way more useful to practice together with the streamer.

    That way, you can comment and interact with them regarding what’s happening, and you will be learning the important things way faster.

    It has been proven time and time again in various psychological studies that interactive learning is possibly the most effective way to learn something, especially when it’s something that you do and when it’s more rooted in practice than in theory.

    So, next time you come into a stream, try to come prepared for whatever’s happening and just follow along!

    Knowing What You Can Expect

    Since most of the mentioned streamers stream content that is uncut, you will see all that goes into being a developer.

    As you probably know, coding is not that straightforward and small but irritating mistakes occur all of the time, and seeing it unfold in real-time will prepare you perfectly, so you won’t end up having uncomfortable surprises and crushed expectations.

    You will know that all of that is normal, and you will be equipped to act accordingly once it does happen to you.

    Getting Familiar With Common Mistakes

    While there are some mistakes that can be specific to the code that you’re working on at the moment, it’s way more likely that whatever happens to you, has already happened multiple times to all developers.

    And that includes the person that you decided to watch.

    It’s inevitable that they will run into some issues while they stream, so you will learn how to deal with them before you even start making them.

    Different Ways Of Problem-Solving

    While it might not look that way to an amateur, programming is actually a very creative thing to do.

    Sometimes, the problems that occur won’t get fixed by the basic simple steps that you learned before, and it will require you to be creative.

    Usually, each developer will have their own way of thinking, so while your solution might work, too, you will be met with some new ways of thinking that could help you in the future.

    Problem-solving is mostly just about thinking out of the box, and hearing other people doing it will teach you how to be better at it yourself.

    Ability To Rewind And Repeat

    It is usually best to work together with the lesson that is going on, but if you’re not that type of a person and that approach confuses you more than it helps, then coding streams can have a big benefit for you.

    Most streamers will post VODs of their streams, so you will have the option to get back to a certain stream once you start to work with the code that you were learning about.

    When you have that video there for you, you will be able to pause it and then do what you need to, and continue when you’re done.

    Also, you’re able to go back to the part you need a limitless amount of time until you’ve mastered the step that causes you trouble.

    Conclusion

    Learning to code by watching streams truly is a great example of mixing things that are fun with things that are useful.

    When you watch these streams, you will be way more relaxed than when in a class, but you will have way better chances of understanding than trying to do this completely on your own.

    It’s a great thing, so you should definitely try it out!

    FAQ

    Where can I watch coding streams?

    Like most popular streams nowadays, the best place to go to is Twitch, as most of these people stream there. But, if streams aren’t your thing, then you can opt for looking their content up on YouTube and learn that way.

    What is Twitch programmed in?

    Twitch uses a transcoding system, and this is implemented by using C/C++ and Go. Essentially, they take the incoming RTMP stream from the broadcaster and transcode it into multiple HLS streams.

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    Stefan

    Stefan is a long-time content creator and one of the Stream Mentor's co-founders. He's a tech geek and a Dota 2 player (not even a good one) who wanted to help others become professional streamers and earn from the comfort of their home.

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